Wild Birds Unlimited – Omaha, NE

September 27, 2014

Common Backyard Hawks

Filed under: Birds,Hawks,Hawks — wbuomaha @ 10:43 am
Tags: , , , ,

For some people, hawks are frequent backyard visitors. But for most of us, their presence is unusual and unexpected. Three hawks commonly seen in backyards are the Red-tailed Hawk, the Cooper’s Hawk, and the Sharp-shinned Hawk.
Redtailed Hawk Flying  c
The Red-Tailed Hawk is about 19” from head to tail. While perched, the tips of its wings just about reach the tips of its tail. Plumage varies in a continuum from whitish to very dark, but you can tell adults by their rufous-red tails. Juveniles have a brownish tail with narrow white bands.
Coopers Hawk
The Cooper’s Hawk is about 16½” from head to tail. Its tail reaches well below its wing tips when perched. The outer tail has alternating bands of light and dark gray, with a broad white band at the tip. The under tail bands are dark gray and white. Wing feathers of adults are blue-gray, and the chest is white with rufous horizontal barring. Juveniles have more brownish plumage. Their chests are creamy white with vertical brown streaks.
Sharpshinned Hawk
The Sharp-shinned Hawk appears to be almost a miniature version of the Cooper’s Hawk, with very similar adult and juvenile plumage. However, the Sharp-shinned Hawk is significantly smaller, only 11 inches from head to tail. Its legs appear skinnier than those of the Cooper’s Hawk. The white terminal band on the Sharp-shinned Hawk’s tail is narrower, if visible at all.

All three of these hawks prey on songbirds, with the larger two also consuming small mammals. If you have bird feeders and baths in your yard, it is a good idea to locate them near evergreen shrubs, bushes or trees which will provide the smaller birds an easy escape when they are threatened by a hawk or other predator.

While hawks are present in your backyard, you will rarely see a songbird. Federal and state laws prohibit the harassment or harming of hawks, so any action that may endanger them is not an option. They are fascinating birds to watch, so enjoy them while they are with you. Usually, they will leave after a few days, and your usual songbirds will return.

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2 Comments »

  1. I had Red-Tailed Hawks sit on my pole feeder. I think they were more interested in the other bird than the seed.

    Comment by George Lozier — October 15, 2014 @ 4:04 pm | Reply


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